Sunday, August 20, 2006

Quarterknees, Breasthooks, Filling and Sanding...

It's been two weeks plus since our last post. We were away on vacation for 8 days. Since we returned, we have been working hard... just have been bad about updating the blog! Tonight we make up for it!

I am happy to say that my son Josh is home for a couple of weeks before college begins again (he was in Seattle all summer)... and that he has been able to join me in finishing this boat! Dan has now left for Optometry School... but will be home on weekends, hopefully to be present at the time of our maiden voyage! You will see Josh in many of these pictures taken over the last few days as we have made major progress on this boat.

The first step shown here is Josh doing some heavy sanding to level out the back corners of the top of the boat, for proper fitting of the Quarterknees. The quarterknees are triangular pieces if 1/4" plywood that pull together the back of the boat, create handholds for lifting, and give a surface to place hooks for tying lines. The sanding is heavy because the angle of the top of the transom does NOT match the angle of the gunwales!
Hard to see it here, but we have a nicely prepared surface now.The quarterknee in place without glue and screws...
Applying glue....
And now attached with glue and screws.The "breasthook" meets the same purposes at the front of the boat... over the stem. Here it is in place, with the screw holes puttied.Another step we completed this weekend is the block-set that will hold the leeboard in place. We drilled a hole in the side of the boat, just forward of the 10' mark. Then we glued a 4" X 4" spacer block on the inside of the boat...As well as an oblong chunk of 1 X 2" on the outside of the hull. As you can see, the thickness of this piece matches the thickness of the gunwales and the chines. The 3/8" bolt will hold the entire thing in place... including the leeboard.
Another need we took care of was sealing the seams between the boat bottom, the hull sides and the frames. We used some water-repellent gap filler that can be painted over. You can see the seams filled nicely here.
One of the more tedious needs to "fill" is the puttying of some 300+ screw heads over the outside and inside of the boat. Here you see me mixing some putty. I spared you the pictures of filling the 300+ holes!
And then, it began! One of the most time consuming parts of this whole job... SANDING! Josh and I spent many hours sanding over the last few days. Here Josh is sanding the bottom of the boat. You can see many of the screw hole filled putty spots now sanded out smooth.
Sanding putty....
Sanding the sail spars...
Sanding the rudder...
Sanding the leeboard...
Sanding the top edge of the hull and gunwales...
Sanding the inside of the hulls... and perhaps we went a little overboard with the sanding...
Sanding our Bassett Hound Cody...
Don't worry. No animals were injured in the filming of this blog!

Thankfully, we expect to have just 1-2 hours of sanding left... before it will be time to paint! We'll show you that later this week! Until then, have fun!

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