Wednesday, July 12, 2006

Adding on...

Over the last couple of days Dan and I have found a few hours here and there to continue adding pieces onto our boat. Because we did so much of our cutting out before, the build seems to be progressing quickly now! We start with attaching the stem to the front of the boat. As you can see, this small piece of wood pulls the two sides together very nicely!Here's an interior close up...
And a view from the top looking down.
Next was the installatiom of the transom. We had a little trouble putting the sides on this... because of a combination of a couple of factors: The side pieces are a bit warped... and, I believe I cut the bevel on the sides of the transom a little under the proper angle. After some "encouragement" via muscles, glue, and screws it finally came together.
Here you can see the back half of the boat...
And here's a side view...
Next it was time to install the chines. If you remember, the chines run the entire length of the boat, and serve at least two purposes: 1) They tie the entire boat together along the bottom of the hulls, adding strength and a smooth line in the process; and, 2) They provide a surface on which to screw and glue the bottom of the boat! Here we used some clamps to hold the first chine in place while we drill pilot holes.
Dan drilling pilot holes.
And here's a shot of the boat with the chines installed on both sides of the boat. We were thrilled to see that these narrow 3/4" square pieces of wood pulled the boat together amazingly well. They took out alot of the twisting caused by the warped plywood. You can see the string we tied from tip of the stem to the center of the transom to test the squareness of the boat. It's looking much better now!

1 Comments:

At 6:36 PM, Blogger John B Dougherty said...

I've encountered the same issue on the transom side bevels. Also on the bottom bevel and transom height overall. All the frame bevels and stem angle seem right. Your blog has been really helpful, thank you!

 

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